Huion H610 Pro Driver Download Latest

By Sebastian

Huion H610 Pro Driver Download Install Update

While the Monoprice tablets I reviewed previously were the best bang for your drawing buck at the time, these new Huion tablets offer a significant bump in specifications and fit and finish without a huge leap in price. No one would call the Monoprice tablets things of beauty, but it was easy to overlook these shortcomings given their price. At around ten percent of the cost of comparable Wacom tablets, with equal or better performance in many regards, the Monoprice line of tablets was my punk-rock drawing tool of choice when not using tablet monitors on my desktops.

Perfect for throwing into a laptop bag, and cheap enough to not have to worry about destroying during travel, the Monoprice filled a niche. And since, Monoprice has replaced their UC-Logic digitizer based offerings with rebranded Huion parts.

Huion is the OEM of the latest generation of Monoprice tablets. The H, K58, and W58 all have a digitizer with levels of pressure, LPI, and a report rate of reports per second. The H Pro improves upon that slightly with LPI, a textured drawing surface, and a rechargeable styli. All tablets have detachable mini-USB cable connections and all but the H Pro come with battery operated styli.

The W58 can be used as a wired tablet while charging via your systems USB port. The P80 is a rechargeable stylus with an internal Li-Ion battery that comes bundled with the K It claims hours of continuous use before needing a recharge.

In practice, I found the stylus held a charge for a few days at a time. Recharging is done via a USB cable that has a proprietary connector on one end that plugs into the stylus. Install it before plugging your tablet in for the first time. In OS X, the tablet can behave strangely if you have third party mouse-steering apps installed. Logitech drivers and USB Overdrive are repeat offenders.

In Windows, be sure to install the drivers before plugging the tablet in. Windows has insidious default tablet drivers it will install otherwise. You may have to reinstall a fresh copy of the OS.

Additionally, in Windows 7 at least, disable Tablet PC services from the services menu. Uninstall Tablet PC components. Minimally, disable Pen Flicks. All of these things impact drawing performance. Please take my advice. Install the drivers before plugging the tablet in. Graphics tablets everywhere will thank you. And so will I. The wireless capability of the W58 is unique. The tablet works in both wired and wireless modes, but the initial setup is the same as its corded brethren. Aside from being finicky about software-before-hardware installation order, I encountered no installation issues in Windows.

When drawing a stroke, the beginning and ends would blob out to full pressure regardless of how light I pressed. While in wireless mode, attempting to open the PenTablet driver app in Applications would result in system freezes and application crashes. I wrote Huion asking for advice and they sent a second piece of hardware along. During testing, they said to try and use the tablet without any drivers installed. Despite this sounding entirely counterintuitive, I gave it a shot. The same problem occurred.

Strokes blobbed out at their beginning and ends while appearing to respond accurately in the middle of their marks. Slow, deliberate strokes showed some jitter and diagonal lines drawn at near 45 degrees seem to exacerbate the issue. I seldom hover slowly and deliberately while mark-making a single line. If you are a hesitant line-maker, bear this possible caveat in mind. The bundled, AAA-powered stylus is a bit stiff out of the box.

The harder pressure curve is a welcome change from the mushy, easy-to-blow-out pressure curve of Wacom hardware, though is a smidge stiffer than I would like. It feels in-hand like a Wacom stylus and has a pressure curve to match. The only drawback being that light pressure strokes blow out to full pressure without much effort. For the W58, performance in Windows was good. An occasional jitter or wonky mouse movement occurred with long use. I suspect those rare hiccups had to do with the 2.

I enjoyed being less tethered to my workstation. The H lived in my laptop bag for six months and the H Pro improved upon the H in enough small ways to warrant replacing it. It boasts levels of pressure sensitivity. The LPI is better. It has a detachable mini-USB cable. The industrial design of the stylus and tablet surface is akin to the Wacom tablets I cut my teeth on. The overall fit and finish feels high-end and not at all indicative of the price tag.

In all measures save for price, the Huion H Pro, H and K58 could be placed on a shelf next to Wacom tablets and the average on-looker would guess they were equals. As per usual, shopping on Amazon using my referral link helps support my efforts to review digital art hardware. This is an update to my previous Huion review that corrects some numbers previously listed incorrectly by the manufacturer and adds the H Pro to the review lineup.

Hardware Specifications The H, K58, and W58 all have a digitizer with levels of pressure, LPI, and a report rate of reports per second. The P80 can be used with the other Huion tablets, but must be purchased separately. Installation and Setup of the W58 The wireless capability of the W58 is unique. Closing Thoughts The H lived in my laptop bag for six months and the H Pro improved upon the H in enough small ways to warrant replacing it.

Huion H610 Pro Driver Download

Huion H610 Drivers Download

While the Monoprice tablets I reviewed previously were the best bang for your drawing buck at the time, these new Huion tablets offer a significant bump in specifications and fit and finish without a huge leap in price. No one would call the Monoprice tablets things of beauty, but it was easy to overlook these shortcomings given their price. At around ten percent of the cost of comparable Wacom tablets, with equal or better performance in many regards, the Monoprice line of tablets was my punk-rock drawing tool of choice when not using tablet monitors on my desktops. Perfect for throwing into a laptop bag, and cheap enough to not have to worry about destroying during travel, the Monoprice filled a niche. And since, Monoprice has replaced their UC-Logic digitizer based offerings with rebranded Huion parts. Huion is the OEM of the latest generation of Monoprice tablets. The H, K58, and W58 all have a digitizer with levels of pressure, LPI, and a report rate of reports per second. The H Pro improves upon that slightly with LPI, a textured drawing surface, and a rechargeable styli. All tablets have detachable mini-USB cable connections and all but the H Pro come with battery operated styli.

Huion H610 User Manual

Huion H610 Pro Driver Download

If you want to keep your Huion H Pro drawing tablet in good condition, or if you want to prevent any of its driver issues, you should keep your drawing tablet driver up to date. The following are two methods that can help you download the correct driver for your Huion H Pro tablet. Driver Easy will automatically recognize your system and find the correct drivers for it. You can download and install your drivers by using either Free or Pro version of Driver Easy. Driver Easy will then scan your computer and detect any problem drivers. Driver Easy uses cookies to provide you with better services. By continue using the website or clicking Close, you agree to our privacy policy and how we use cookies.

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